10 facts about St George’s Day

 

ENGLAND Nottingham Flag

ENGLAND Nottingham Flag

  1. St. George has been the patron saint of England since the 14th century, but only 1 in 5 know St. George’s Day falls on 23 April.
  2. A quarter of English People don’t know who their patron saint is!
  3. He was born in Turkey (in Cappadocia in 270 AD)
  4. He became a Roman soldier. He protested against Rome’s (Emperor Diocletian’s) persecution of Christians. He himself was a Christian and was imprisoned and tortured, but stayed true to his faith. He was beheaded near Lydda in Palestine on 23 April 303 AD
  5. In 1222, the Council of Oxford declared April 23 to be St George’s Day and he replaced St Edmund the Martyr as England’s patron saint in the 14th century. In 1415, April 23 was made a national feast day.
  6. St George is patron saint not only of England but also of Ethiopia, Georgia, Greece, Lithuania, Palestine, Portugal, and Russia
  7. St George is also patron saint of scouts, soldiers, archers, cavalry and chivalry, farmers and field workers, riders and saddlers, and he helps those suffering from leprosy, plague and syphilis!
  8. He never really fought a Dragon. In the Middle Ages the dragon was commonly used to represent the Devil. The slaying of the dragon by St George was first credited to him in the twelfth century, long after his death. It’s likely that the many stories connected with St George’s name are fictitious.
  9. His emblem, a red cross on a white background, is the flag of England, and part of the British flag. St George’s emblem was adopted by Richard The Lion Heart and brought to England in 12th Century
  10. Shakespeare was born on 23 April 1564 and he died on the same day in 1616.

 

Ian Bowland is proud to be from England and proud to live in Nottingham. Don’t let St George’s Day be hijacked by bigots!